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newcomer womens services

Tell us about your program

Newcomer Women’s Services is a nonprofit organization that provides assistance to recently arrived immigrant women in areas such as employment, settlement, English language development and others. Our service population is diverse which means our students reflect a myriad of cultures and ages. For this particular project, our focus encompassed elements from elder rights, community engagement, and art. 

underthemangotree

Our organization brought forth a Council of Elders to share traditional stories from their homeland. Some are happy, while others are sad, but all of them have a lesson to teach about the importance of elder rights. Further, each senior worked with a peer to create artwork that complemented their particular story. Later, these were used to create a children’s storybook to start an intergenerational conversation about elder rights in their respective communities. As the seniors engaged with children to read them the story, both groups then worked to color in the pages.
This quality time further fostered a loving relationship and ensured that a strong bond was created. 
http://www.newcomerwomen.org/storytelling-for-elder-rights.html

Status

Completed

What worked well? What was challenging?

The project was a massive undertaking and challenges included the elements of time management, project development, and scheduling. However, our work was a groundbreaking success as the Council of Elders effectively organized 16 community gatherings across Toronto within the span of one week. The story and the coloring crafts were enjoyed by all and had a very positive influence on newcomer seniors and children. 

Was the program evaluated? If so, how?

The program was not evaluated.

What did you learn from the experience?

The coloring books were successfully used during the 2016 Summer Camp that was run by the organization and encompassed children between the ages of 4 to 12. The minders crafted a closer relationship with the camp goers by reading them the story and explaining to them the moral of each. Not only did the children learn new lessons and enjoy novel stories, but it allowed the camp counselors to really understand and craft a greater bond with them. Coloring the pictures added extra enjoyment as well. 


Related material: Check out Starting the Conversation About Elder Rights - Elder Abuse Prevention PSA video by Newcomer Women’s Services in Toronto

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SHARP"Our goal is to learn from patients and their families, to develop a sustainable network and advance the development of research priorities, collaborations, ultimately improving the health care system for older adults. We will work with seniors to:

  • Develop the network, and understand what they would like the network to look like
  • Develop meaningful partnerships with researchers, policy makers, health care providers and other key stakeholders
  • Participate in various health-related research projects
  • Take part in regular discussions with the SHARP research team and other stakeholders through online and community events
  • Access information, news, and research surrounding patient engagement, health care research and planning, and health system transformation through our website and social media"

For more information and/or to join the network: 

Source: Seniors Helping As Research Partners

 

 

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Program title

Scaling Up Elder Financial Abuse Awareness and Prevention Dialogue Project

Tell us about your program

The Finding Home Initiative's Neighbourhood Dialogue Capacity Building Program partnered with the BC Association of Neighbourhood Houses on a regional project with ethno-cultural communities.

Using the Finding Home process and program, we worked with Afghan, South Asian Punjabi, Iranian and Canadian born seniors. The objectives were to:
1) To increase awareness, skills and knowledge of seniors from diverse ehtnocultural communities and 2) to build capacity of Neighbourhood Houses and Immigrant Service Providers.

There were 4 Phases to our project:

  • Preparation (forming team, research, asset inventory);
  • Capacity Building (leadership training, outreach, convene groups);
  • Seniors Dialogues (dialogues, resource kits, peer support, posters, generate self organizing seniors led projects; and
  • Distribution (Forum, evaluation, final report)

Status

Ongoing

What worked well? What was challenging?

We successfully worked worked with seniors who denied abuse existed in their communities who by the end of the project were public speakers on elder financial abuse. We trained over 38 front line workers and volunteers and the seniors themselves generated over13 self organizing community projects. A sample of these include:
1) Victims to Champions Speakers Bureau;
2) Elder Finanacial Abuse awareness and prevention video;
3) new South Asian Punjabi cultural celebration to address gender equality and promote kindness and caring called Sisters and Daughters Day,
4) an Afghan puppet theatre show on Respect in the Family.

The seniors reached thousands of peers through these projects and millions were reached via media coverage. Challenges included host agencies finding bridge funding to support seniors initiatives in an on-going when enthusiasm is high and prior to core funding being found.

Was the program evaluated? If so, how?

An external evaluator evaluated the program using creative tools and approaches to be culturally accessible to our diverse participants and teams such as graphic facilitation and one on one interviews and focus groups.

What did you learn from the experience?

We are now working on Scaling Up Elder Abuse Awareness and Prevention with South Vancouver Neighbourhood House, Vancity and Immigrant Services Society of BC. Our goal is to create a sustainable infrastructure to address the challenges in the previous project. Follow our blog at www.worldviewstrategies.com to learn more!

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Program title

Elder Abuse Prevention Workshops & Training

Tell us about your program

BC Centre for Elder Advocacy and Support, a provincial, non-profit charitable society, offers workshops on financial literacy and elder abuse prevention to older adults and the community at large. Where possible, we deliver training to service providers, such that staff and volunteers are aware and equipped with knowledge and resources to respond to abuse and neglect of older adults. 
If you are interested in hosting a workshop or training session, or would like more information, please contact us at 1-888-688-1927 or email  

Status

Ongoing

What worked well? What was challenging?

Through collaborative efforts with local organizations and networks, we have engaged and trained over 100 service providers and volunteers in 10 communities throughout BC on recognizing and responding to abuse and neglect of older adults over the past year.

Was the program evaluated? If so, how?

Yes, this program is evaluated through qualitative analysis of workshop content and participant feedback.

What did you learn from the experience?

Many of the current resources addressing financial literacy and elder abuse prevention are written in English, and few are available in other languages.

 

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