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cover irppstudy 2019 navigatinghealthandsocialservicesforoa''Canada’s aging population faces a harsh reality: growing numbers of older Canadians with chronic illnesses, disabilities and cognitive impairment are regularly discouraged by the efforts required to access and coordinate fragmented health and social care services. These challenges are often most profound for those who cannot rely on help from family members or friends, but they add greatly to caregivers’ burden as well. In this study, Laura Funk argues that navigation problems are rooted in the structures and operations of existing care systems, as well as the downloading of administrative and coordination tasks to individual patients and their families. In her view, navigation work must be transformed from a private struggle into a public responsibility. (...)

Although there has been an expansion of navigation supports in recent years, existing programs, whether provided by nonprofit organizations or by government agencies, are often specific to particular care-setting transitions, such as from hospital to home, or to people with particular health conditions, such as cancer or dementia. Availability varies greatly across regions and locations of care. A dedicated, comprehensive policy strategy is needed to reduce the navigation burden for broader patient and caregiver populations.

The author proposes a three-pronged patient-centered approach to alleviate navigation problems. It consists of improving service information, expanding public navigation programs and better integrating care services for older adults. Removing the navigation hurdles faced by older persons and their caregivers is key not only for improving their health and well-being but also for preventing exhaustion among caregivers and reducing inequities in service access. Doing so could also make it possible for older adults to remain at home longer if they wish to do so.''

Source: Institute for Research on Public Policy

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The following is part of our project “Increasing Access to Justice for Older Adult Victims of Sexual Assault: A Capacity Building Approach”, funded by the Justice Canada Victims Fund.Learn more about this project or consult the full list of resources

cover snapshot4 fall2019 bowsThis is the fourth in a series of Research Snapshots which are being produced for the CNPEA's Access to Justice for Older Victims of Sexual Assault project. Each Snapshot features a relevant research study or resource from Canada or emerging topics that have been identified in other countries. 

Snapshot #4 summarizes the first comprehensive review incorporating empirical research on sexual violence against older people across multiple disciplines and fields of study.

Article Citation: Bows (2017). Sexual Violence Against Older People: A Review of the Empirical Literature. Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, 1-17.

Authors of the snapshot: Amy Peirone and Myrna Dawson

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The following is part of our project “Increasing Access to Justice for Older Adult Victims of Sexual Assault: A Capacity Building Approach”, funded by the Justice Canada Victims Fund.Learn more about this project or consult the full list of resources

cover snapshot3 sept2019 filebornThis is the third in a series of Research Snapshots which are being produced for the CNPEA's Access to Justice for Older Victims of Sexual Assault project. Each Snapshot features a relevant research study or resource from Canada or emerging topics that have been identified in other countries. 

Snapshot #3 summarizes a critical review of the current knowledge base and literature on the sexual assault of older women. It presents a brief synopsis of some of the author's key findings and discussion points, with an emphasis on the gaps in our understanding and suggestions for future research.

Article Citation: Fileborn, B. (2016). Sexual assault and justice for older women: A critical review of the literature.Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, 1-12.ext

Authors of the snapshot: Amy Peirone and Myrna Dawson

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covergamblingThe purpose of this research and development project was to describe the complete gambling experience and to develop best practices for the prevention of problem gambling among older adults (55 years and over) in Ontario. We hope that these best practices help enhance prevention programs, services, and practices. In addition, we hope that this study prompts future research that examines areas that are currently insufficiently researched and helps provoke a dialogue that will lead to a broader knowledge base to guide prevention policies and practices directed at this growing segment of the population.

Publisher: Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
Journal of Gambling Issues
Issue 39, September 2018

Authors: Nigel E. Turner, Jamie Wiebe, Peter Ferentzy, Nadine Kauffman, Salaha Zaheer, Trudy Smit Quosai, Travis Sztainert, Robert Murray, Hayley Hamilton, Sherald Sanchez, Flora Matheson, John McCready, Robert E. Mann

Source: Journal of Gambling Issues

User Rating: 5 / 5

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anugusreidinst cover"A wide-ranging new study from the nonprofit Angus Reid Institute, conducted in partnership with Cardus, explores the quality and quantity of human connection in the lives of Canadians today, revealing significant segments of society in need of the emotional, social and material benefits connectedness can bring.

This study sorts Canadians along two key dimensions: social isolation (or the number and frequency of interpersonal connections a person has) and loneliness (or their relative satisfaction with the quality of those connections). From these and other findings, a detailed portrait of isolation and loneliness in Canada emerges, sorting Canadians into five groups: The Desolate (23%), the Lonely but not Isolated (10%), the Isolated but not Lonely (15%), the Moderately Connected (31%), and the Cherished (22%).


Content:
Part 1: What are social isolation and loneliness?
Part 2: The Index of Loneliness and Social Isolation (ILSI)
Part 3: Key Takeaways from the ILSI
Part 4: SolutionsPart 4: Solutions• Introvert or extrovert?• Does technology help?• Most want more time with friends and family"

Source: Angus Reid Institute

 

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